Remarks

From A Wiki on National Parliament Buildings Worldwide



The last data revision took place april 2016.

General Information on the Data provided

Some remarks on the data provided, their scope and the sources The collection covers parliamentary buildings of 193 member states of the United Nations, and three non-member states: Taiwan (officially the Republic of China/ROC), Kosovo and Palestine. Naturally, the quantitative data provided for the parliamentary buildings (and their respective countries) neither drafts a full picture of the country, nor of the situation of its inhabitants or its political culture. The data enables us to compare countries by some indicators and offers explanatory value for some questions. However, quantitative data can shed light only on specific segments of our world, and they always express some kind of simplification of social realities that are more complex and contextual.


Location and political system

After naming the country and the city where the parliamentary building is located, we suggest an assessment of the political system. Except for single-party states, which usually claim to be something different than they are, we relate to the countries' legal framework, and evaluate them de jure. The focal points of the assessment are the cleavages federalism vs. unitarism, republic vs. monarchy and the organization as parliamentary or presidential systems. We also added absolute monarchies, Islamic republics (if self-designated), the Swiss directorial system and principalities.

Population:

"Population" refers to the total population of a country.

Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Devision (2015), World Population Prospects - The 2015 Revision, Key Findings and Advance Tables. Working Paper No. ESA/P/WP.241.

Exceptions: World Bank Numbers for Kosovo (2014), and CIA World Factbook estimates for Taiwan (2015)

GDP per capita (PPP):

"GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars." Worldbank (last retrieved 01.04.16).

Source: World Bank 2015, International Comparison Program database.

Exceptions: CIA Factbook estimates for Andorra (2011), Angola (2015), Argentina (2015), Cuba (2010), Eritrea (2015), Gambia (2015), Guyana (2015), North Korea (2013), Liechtenstein (2009), Monaco (2013), Myanmar (2012), Nauru (2015), San Marino (2015), Somalia (2010), Syria (2011), Taiwan (2015), Venezuela (2015), Yemen (2015).

Land area (sq. km):

"Land area is a country's total area, excluding area under inland water bodies, national claims to continental shelf, and exclusive economic zones. In most cases the definition of inland water bodies includes major rivers and lakes." Worldbank (last retrieved 11.04.14)

Source: World Bank 2011 (via Food and Agriculture Organization, electronic files and web site).

Exceptions: United Nations Statistics Division (UNSTATS) for Nauru and Palestine, CIA Factbook for South Sudan, national data/ Ministry of the Interior, Taiwan/ROC for Taiwan.

C02 Emissions (kilotons):

These numbers correspond to a timeseries report of ‘’country-specific CO2 emission totals of fossil fuel use and industrial processes (cement production, carbonate use of limestone and dolomite, non-energy use of fuels and other combustion).“ European Comission, Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (last retrieved 10.03.2016).

Source: European Commission, 2015 (Joint Research Center (JRC)/ PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency. Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research, release version 4.3

Exceptions: UNSTATS/ United Nations Statistics Division for Andorra (2011), the Federated Staes of Micronesia (2011), Liechtenstein (2011), Marshall Islands (2011) and Montenegro (2011), Data for Kosovo via Konema World Bank Climate Change Data (2011), and Timeseries data for Kosovo. No Data for Monaco, San Marino and South Sudan.

CO2 Emissions per capita for world countries Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (last retrieved 14.03.2016)

Source: European Commission, 2015 (Joint Research Center (JRC)/ PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency. Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research, release version 4.3

Exceptions: UNSTATS/ United Nations Statistics Division for Andorra (2011), the Federated Staes of Micronesia (2011), Liechtenstein (2011), Marshall Islands (2011) and Montenegro (2011), Data for Kosovo via Konema World Bank Climate Change Data (2011), and Timeseries data for Kosovo. No Data for Monaco, San Marino and South Sudan.

Human Development Index (HDI):

The HDI rankings are published by the UNDP (United Nations Development Programme). The HDI tries to capture human development by the indicator's life expectancy, education and income. The cited data is taken from the 2015 Report.

Democracy Index:

The Democracy Index is published and designed by the Economist Intelligence Unit and provides data on the democratic development in 167 countries. Democracy is measured within five different categories: electoral process and pluralism, civil liberties, functioning of government, political participation and political culture. Cited data refers to the Democracy Index 2015.

Members of Parliament:

Members of Parliament (total) / Members of Parliament (women): In case of bicameral legislature, the data refers to the number of members of parliament of the lower house.

Source: Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), PARLINE database on national parliaments, 1 Jan. 2016 Tables.

Exceptions: Members of Parliament for Brunei, Central African Republic, Kosovo, Palestine and Taiwan: The World Factbook, CIA (release date: 12.2013)
Women in Parliament for the Central African Republic, Kosovo, Palestine and Taiwan: Quota Project, Global Database on Quotas for Women, by IDEA and Stockholm University. (revisioned: 2.2016)

Built

"Built" refers to the year of the completion of the building. (ren) stands for "renovation", which implies major changes in the building's structure, opposed to acts of mere restoration. (ext) stands for "extension". (rec) refers to "reconstruction", "u.c." refers to "under construction".

Architect

"Architect" refers to the name of the architect(s), the architectural firm or sometimes the construction company. The employment of a comma between two names implies that the project was conceived and/or conducted by different architects in one time frame; the employment of a diagonal slash between two names implies that the project was conceived and/or conducted by different architects with major temporal breaks, delays or interruptions.

Type of Plenary Hall

Since the institutionalization of the parliament a number of different types of spatial organization for the assembly have developed. The British (Westminster) type emphasizes the agonistic division between ruling parties and opposition. The center of the assembly is occupied by the "Speaker of the House" who presides over the sessions. Speeches are not addressed directly towards the opponents, but to the speaker as the mediator of the debate. The semi-circle type as developed in the late 18th in the course of the French revolution focusses on the unity of the national assembly. The speaker takes the focal position and directly addresses all deputies, with consensus as the ultimate goal of the political debate. The horse-shoe type is a hybrid between the two former spatial arrangements. The circular type achieves the most uniform distribution of the deputies. For reasons of visibility and audibility of the speaker, this model is rare and mostly not realized in its pure form. It avoids the spatial division in left and right that has been used to name political ideologies. With a few exceptions – e.g. the Swedish and Norwegian parliaments, where seats are distributed according to regions – the deputies are arranged according to their right wing or left wing orientation. The classroom type represents a rational distribution avoiding a unique focal point. The speaker is no longer at the center of attention.


This wiki was developed as part of the exhibition "Plenum -Places of Power".